It’s just data

It Just Works

Robert Scoble: What do you think? Did I miss anything in my list of 12?

Jamie Zawinski (1998) Linux is only free if your time has no value

Ray Ozzie (via Joshua Allen) Convincing case that “Internet makes software deploy at lightspeed”, is not the same as saying “Web apps deploy at lightspeed”.  He’s framing the discussion as software on the Internet, rather than thin-client DHTML.

Simon Willison: the key reason that open source development tools are so compelling: they put you in charge of your own destiny.


Scoble tosses out a softball.  I’ll bite.  As a developer, I do run a few things on the bleeding edge, so for that I agree with Simon above.  But mostly, I’m a user.  I want things that just work.

For years, I ran Windows as my desktop OS.  Sure, I flirted briefly with Netscape when it came out, but I switched back to IE because frankly it was better.

A few years ago, I noticed something.  IE was abandoned.  I was abandoned.  I didn’t like it.  So I switched first to Mozilla, then to Firefox.  Sure, tabs were nice.  But even better was the support for standards. And the lack of pop-ups and spyware.  I understand it that IE now has blockers.  And there is even a promise of a next release.  But will I be abandoned again?

Then I had my registry go corrupt.  At the same time I was being hassled for GenuineCheck and then a legitcheck when I simply wanted to download a security patch.  I had already given up two hours of productivity a week to virus scans.  I had enough.  I switched to Ubuntu.

Ubuntu boots off of a CD.  It comes with Graphics, Internet, and Office tools.  Where I had once ran AIM with advertisements and could only connect to a single service, I now run GAIM with no ads, can connect to multiple services.  And I even get spell check.

But I’m a developer.  I want more.  I want ruby.  And subversion.  And cvs.  And build tools.  Each is only an apt-get away.  There even is a convenient GUI for this.  Ray’s vision of the future, I have today.  And whereas Windows Update kept the OS and selected Microsoft tools up to date, the Debian packaging manager keeps everything up to date and in synch.  Without ever needing to reboot.

And there is more.  If I ever felt the urge to build a PBX, I’d do an apt-get install asterisk.  If I wanted to build a DVR, I’d do an apt-get install mythtv.

The latest version of Ubuntu was released last month.  The next version?  April.

Convenience.  Security.  Predictability.  More options.  Less hassle.

I like that.

Jamie’s 1998 observation has effectively been flipped.  At least for me.


t Just Works

I’m getting a 404 from the link in the feed. I think it’s the missing ‘I’ in ‘It’.

Posted by Randy Charles Morin at

I am with you on this one. I switched to MacOSX tree years ago and if not a sucky notebooks I would’ve been using it now. Then I switched to Ubuntu and don’t want to use anything else. Works perfectly on my powerful Dell notebook which cast me less then 1K.

Posted by Kent at

I really want to believe that installing software on Linux is THAT easy, but almost every apt-get or yum install is followed by cd /etc; vi obscure.conf.

Posted by christopher baus at

Linux Just Works

But I’m a developer.  I want more.  I want ruby.  And subversion.  And cvs.  And build tools.  Each is only an apt-get away.  There even is a convenient GUI for this.  Ray’s vision of the future, I have today.  And whereas Windows Update kept the OS...

Excerpt from 0xDECAFBAD at

Much of this comes down, I believe, to the monolithic nature of Windows. With Linux, your distribution consists of a great number of little tools working together which can all work on their own release schedule. This makes the release cycle for most of these parts MUCH smaller than the 5 years MS now needs to get a new OS out the door. If Microsoft were to split up Windows into smaller parts, I believe that would fix some of their problems.

I’m still on Windows because I just can’t get used to the Linux widgets and font rendering just yet - which are not always as good as on Windows. Nevertheless, I try every few months, because I really want to.

Posted by Manuzhai at

I’m still on Windows because I just can’t get used to the Linux widgets and font rendering just yet - which are not always as good as on Windows.

This is something I initially had as my pet peeve with Linux, but nowadays, I think font rendering in Linux is much better than in Windows. The sub-pixel antialiasing leaves my text more readable.

This is on my out-of-the-box Ubuntu 5.10 install.

Posted by Arve Bersvendsen at

Sam Ruby: It Just Works

This is true for me too Sam Ruby: It Just Works.......

Excerpt from 42 at

Jamie’s 1998 observation has effectively been flipped.

Yes!

Posted by Phil Wilson at

It Just Works [Sam Ruby]

[link]...

Excerpt from del.icio.us/tag/ubuntu at

Sam Ruby: “Convenience. Security. Predictability. More options. Less hassle. I like that.”...

Excerpt from OSZone Blog at

Linux just works

It’s a great feeling, being able to do my work on my own terms. I don’t think I’ll ever go back.... [more]

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Jeremy Zawodny : It Just Works - It Just Works: Sam Ruby’s take on Linux vs. Windows Tags : links...

Excerpt from HotLinks - Level 1 at

OS for developers: Linux or Windows?

... [more]

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Choosing Platforms

In response to Scoble’s listing the top 12 reasons entrepreneurs don’t build off of the Windows platform (and, you...... [more]

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And whereas Windows Update kept the OS and selected Microsoft tools up to date, the Debian packaging manager keeps everything up to date and in synch.  Without ever needing to reboot.

Amen. This is exactly the reason why even Mac OS X isn’t comparable with Debian based systems like Ubuntu. Mac OS X updates itself and Apple tools like iTunes or Quicktime nicely. But for example what about a new version of Ruby? What about Python? What about other typical *nix tools?

Posted by Giulio Piancastelli at

Ubuntu wins converts

Sam Ruby is well impressed with Ubuntu. And why not? It has everything a body needs....

Excerpt from andy pierce's weblog at

links for 2005-11-04

Brilliant Labs, Inc. Are you finding it difficult to find the photos you want from the thousands you’ve accumulated on your hard drive? BrilliantPhoto makes managing your growing digital photo library fast, easy and fun. (tags: photo management...

Excerpt from The Unkaizened Life at

links for 2005-11-04

Mind Hacks: Open-access sleep special at Nature “contains a number of articles summarising recent research in the world of sleep” (tags: science sleep research) Sam Ruby: It Just Works (tags: linux ubuntu desktop) Twisted "an asynchronous networking framework written...... [more]

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Debian based systems work so well as apt-get provides a solid contract between the users and the developers that the packages they use will work and install with the base system. Upgrades will go smoothly and changes will be documented in an easy to find place. Futhermore, blogs combined with google makes it incredibly easy to find solutions other people have deployed to config complicated software.

Compare that with Windows, were you have to pay for software you aren’t sure works. Often the developers say the software does things it doesn’t.  There is no contract between the base system and the developers to provide smooth upgrades and service, let a lone the users.  Even if you do use Windows Update, you are always unsure that if your virus checker breaks for even half a minute if you would survive.

The only place where Linux loses at the moment is hardware support. Particularly for things like laptop suspends.  Even there Ubuntu is hard at work making it easy to use on standard brand name laptops.

Posted by Nicholas Lee at

links for 2005-11-04

Mind Hacks: Open-access sleep special at Nature “contains a number of articles summarising recent research in the world of sleep” (tags: science sleep research) Sam Ruby: It Just Works (tags: linux ubuntu desktop) Twisted "an asynchronous networking...

Excerpt from Full Speed at

The Mac OS X experience

I’ve worked under Mac OS X for more than five months now, and still have mixed feelings about it. I was ready to shout and yell at the stupid operating system which seems unable to bend over my working style; but then I realized there’s...

Excerpt from The Long Dark Tea-time of the Blog at

Setting up a Catalyst development environment

More notes / opinions and tips on setting up Catalyst development environment to play in, in addition to stuff you’ll find here. Even if you don’t know Perl, you’ve probably heard of CPAN, which was inspiration for PHP’s...

Excerpt from SitePoint Blogs at

Ultra Sysadmin

I’ve got this Ultra 20 which among other things has a huge disk with room for lots of operating systems. I want to fool around a bit with Linux and Solaris Classic and GNU/Solaris, run some Bonnie numbers and also shake down my own stuff on all...

Excerpt from ongoing at

Ubuntu impresses Tim Bray

Try ongoing � Ultra Sysadmin to read of Tim’s experiments with different Operating Systems on a Sun Ultra 20.......

Excerpt from 42 at

ubuntu luv

To put the following in context with my own use: I’ve been using Ubuntu for quite a while now on secondary servers and I switched to using it on my primary development computers for more than a couple months now, so what Sam states was of no...

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Sam Ruby: It Just Works

Someone at Smarking has bookmarked your post.... [more]

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links for 2005-11-04

Mind Hacks: Open-access sleep special at Nature “contains a number of articles summarising recent research in the world of sleep” (tags: science sleep research) Sam Ruby: It Just Works (tags: linux ubuntu desktop) Twisted "an asynchronous networking framework written...... [more]

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