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XML:Atom

Ben Trott: I've released XML::Atom, a Perl implementation of all things Atom. The goal for XML::Atom is to provide an implementation of the syndication feed format, the API, and the archiving format planned for Atom. Currently, it provides support for the feed format, and an implementation of a client for the API.

Cool!  Some ideas for a 0.03 version:

P.S.  Instead of calling the API createEntry, why not simply call it post?


At what point was a well defined comment determined in the Atom wiki? Could you provide a link to that discussion?

When I was active in this endeavor, I recall that a great deal of time and effort was spent on what is a well formed post. I never saw or read about such a discussion for comments.

Posted by Timothy Appnel at

http://www.intertwingly.net/blog/1587.html

Feedback welcome.

Posted by Sam Ruby at

So let's see: XML::Atom 0.01 supported Atom-digest, which allows both client and server to verify to each other that they know the user's password, but does not require either client or server to store that password in plaintext. 0.02 replaces this with WSSE, which offers no verification that the server you think you're talking to actually knows the password (and could therefore easily be spoofed), and requires both client and server to store the password in plaintext.

Why is this progress?

Posted by Mark at

WSSE Username Token Digest doesn't require you to store the password in plain text.

One could argue that Atom-digest required you to store the password in exactly the format that Atom-digest specified.  Already have a bunch of passwords that are not stored in that format?  If so, then you are screwed.

Actually, you are not.  What actually is required is for some process or algorithm for generating a key based on the original password.  This could be an opaque string.  Something like "ff73b4f5e7c01872ac1fb71ec6668e181d232ecf".  That is the shared secret than needs to be stored, i.e., entered into places like config.xml files.

Posted by Sam Ruby at

Sam: Why was that posted to your blog and not the wiki? Was consensus reached? Why did it appear in Joe's API spec months before well formed comments had even begun to be discussed?

Posted by Timothy Appnel at

Tim, it was posted on my weblog because it was something that I have speculatively implemented.  And also in an attempt to give the topic a wider visibility, mainly because some people have chosen not to participate in that venue.

As to Joe's spec... ask him.

Posted by Sam Ruby at

I thought Joe's spec was the spec? I'm confused. Now I remember why I had to stop. What is the spec a would-be developer should use as a reference?

Posted by Timothy Appnel at

Tim, all we have at this point are RFCs.  I chose to do prototypes in order to generate comments.  At some point, we will approach a standards body (most likely, the IETF).

Posted by Sam Ruby at

So is Ben wasting his time trying to implement something that is stated to appear in his company's products because it could drastically change in the coming years befores its submitted to the IETF?

Posted by Timothy Appnel at

Timothy,
  Any vendor that implements a draft standard faces this issue. Whether he is wasting his time or not depends on how much his customers value the provided functionality and how he plans to migrate his users when the final version is released.

  Vendors have to figure out how to strike the right balance between implementing a draft standard as it is being designed so they can provide implementation feedback as well as be quick to market while not tying their products to a technology before it matures

Posted by Dare Obasanjo at

XML:Atom ....

Trackback from bLOGical at

Idea realy cool..

Posted by Andrew Zubritsky at

Tim, this is the tricky thing about formats and protocols, when to freeze them, and getting buy-in on the freeze.

If you look at the history of RSS, and assume it predicts what Atom will go through, the answer is that Ben will have to pedal hard to keep up.

If anything, because there are so many more cooks, it looks like the Atom experience will be even worse.

But it's hard to predict what will happen.

BTW, they have to worry not only about current implementors but future ones too. When we tried to freeze RSS 0.91, there was no Movable Type, or even Blogger.

BTW, of course the usual suspects will cry foul because I said what I think. Maybe this time they'll consider this disclaimer enough. Probably not. ;->

Posted by Dave Winer at

FOUL! :)

Posted by Randy Charles Morin at

XML::Atom 0.02 released

Ben Trott: I've released XML::Atom, a Perl implementation of all things Atom. The goal for XML::Atom is to provide an implementation of the syndication feed format, the API, and the archiving format planned for Atom. Currently, it provides support...

Excerpt from Finally Atom at

If anything, because there are so many more cooks, it looks like the Atom experience will be even worse.

But it's hard to predict what will happen.

Posted by David at

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